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Reflexology for Sciatic relief

By April 15, 2018Blogs

I’ve been reading “Holly at Chinese reflexology”. One of my clients is suffering a bit of sciatic pain, so I thought I’d brush up. She’s a great teacher but the blogs are a bit long and detailed for my client, so I’ve reproduced the findings in a simpler, easier to read way.

From the Western perspective, sciatica is radiating pain, tingling, or numbness along the sciatic nerve. This nerve starts in your lower back, goes through your butt, down the back of your legs, and goes all the way to your feet. The sciatic nerve is the longest nerve in your body!
From a Chinese perspective the root cause of sciatic pain is linked to an emotion, in this case fear. Louise Hay, the author of  “You Can Heal Your Life” (a book I highly recommend), states that the mental roots of sciatica are being hypocritical, a fear of money, and/or a fear of the future. It’s entirely up to you how much you want to take on board regarding emotions and the mind body connection. I was lucky enough to study Chinese medicine as part of my university degree, and I’ve always found it deeply interesting.

1. How to Locate and Massage the Chinese Reflexology Point for the Sciatic Nerve

There’s a line on the inside of the lower leg, and one on the outside. On the inside of the leg, the line begins behind your ankle and follows underneath your tibia bone (the big bone on the inside of your calf) until below the knee. On the outside of your leg, the line starts below the knee and follows under the fibula bone (the smaller leg bone on the outside of your calf) until you reach behind your ankle.

To massage these lines, stand with one foot on a chair or stool, like you’re taking a step up. On the INSIDE of your leg, knuckle UP your leg, following under the crest of the shin bone until you reach your knee.

On the OUTSIDE knuckle (fibula bone ) DOWN your leg, following the bone, until you reach the back of the ankle on the outside of your foot. Always go UP on the inside and DOWN on the outside. Massage 15 to 20 strokes twice a day on both legs.

2. How to Locate and Massage the Chinese Reflexology Point for the Inner Hip

You’ve got two hip points to massage—the first is for the inner hip and the second is for the outer hip point. These hip points are covered in detail in Holly’s book, Sole Fundamentals.

Chinese reflexology inner hip point

The inner hip reflexology point is shaped like a curved tube of macaroni. To locate this point, take your thumb and feel for the slight indentation under and behind your anklebone. To massage this point, apply a bit of lubricant such as massage oil or moisturize. This will help to reduce friction because when you rub this area, you don’t want to irritate the skin on the edge of your foot, which is much more delicate and sensitive than the sole of your foot.

Massage with your thumb back and forth along the point for 15 to 30 seconds 3 to 4 times a day. Because there are nerves running through this area, you may feel a weird sensation when you massage this point if you accidentally hit a nerve. The sensation may feel like a mild electric shock and it will last for less than a second. If this happens to you, use less pressure and massage for no more than 15 seconds.

3. How to Locate and Massage the Chinese Reflexology Point for the Outer Hip

The Chinese reflexology point for the outer hip is behind and below the outer anklebone. Use your index finger to feel for the indentation and massage this area back and forth for 15 to 30 seconds 3 to 4 times a day. As the skin is sensitive here too, use a dab of massage oil or lotion to reduce friction when massaging this area.

Author Jules Neary

Jules Neary (BA Hons) is one of Australia’s most popular Complementary therapists, an author, an educator and founder of Sole Revival Rejuvenating Studio and Sole Revival Training Academy. Armed with an abundance of knowledge, scientific research and a true desire to help people regain their natural balance, Jules empowers and inspires people to take charge of their health and well-being through her educational classes, Rejuvenating treatments and social media pages.

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